THE GREAT DISMAL SWAMP: MANAGEMENT OF A HYDROLOGIC RESOURCE WITH THE AID OF REMOTE SÉNSING1

Authors

  • Virginia Carter,

    1. Respectively, U.S. Geological Survey, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia; Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia.
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  • Mary Keith Garrett,

    1. Respectively, U.S. Geological Survey, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia; Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia.
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  • Lurie Shima,

    1. Respectively, U.S. Geological Survey, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia; Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia.
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  • Patricia Gammon

    1. Respectively, U.S. Geological Survey, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia; Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, USFWS, Suffolk, Virginia.
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  • 1

    Paper No. 12345 of the Water Resources Bulletin. Discussions are open until June 1, 1977.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Both color infrared aerial photography and Landsat data are being used to provide information to meet present and future management goals for the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. High and low altitude color infrared photographs are being used to study the hydrology and map the present vegetation of the swamp. A variety of significant ecologic units have been identified using these photographs. The completed maps will be used to evaluate analyses of landsat digital data. Once the present data base is compiled, it is hoped that routine analysis of Landsat data can be used for updating or to indicate areas where low altitude coverage or ground checking is desirable. The data base will also aid in identifying and evaluating trends that may provide guidelines for wetland management.

Ancillary