AQUATIC IMPACTS OF DEICING SALTS IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, CALIFORNIA1

Authors

  • Roderick W. Hoffman,

    1. Respectively, Environmental Scientist, CH2M HILL, Inc., CH2M HILL, 450 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California 94111; Professor, University of California, Division of Environmental Studies, University of California, Davis, California 95616; Research Technician, University of Nevada, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154; and Biologist, Dept. of Transportation, Transportation Laboratory, Dept. of Transportation. State of California, Sacramento, California 95819.
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  • Charles R. Goldman,

    1. Respectively, Environmental Scientist, CH2M HILL, Inc., CH2M HILL, 450 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California 94111; Professor, University of California, Division of Environmental Studies, University of California, Davis, California 95616; Research Technician, University of Nevada, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154; and Biologist, Dept. of Transportation, Transportation Laboratory, Dept. of Transportation. State of California, Sacramento, California 95819.
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  • Sherrell Paulson,

    1. Respectively, Environmental Scientist, CH2M HILL, Inc., CH2M HILL, 450 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California 94111; Professor, University of California, Division of Environmental Studies, University of California, Davis, California 95616; Research Technician, University of Nevada, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154; and Biologist, Dept. of Transportation, Transportation Laboratory, Dept. of Transportation. State of California, Sacramento, California 95819.
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  • Gary R. Winters

    1. Respectively, Environmental Scientist, CH2M HILL, Inc., CH2M HILL, 450 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California 94111; Professor, University of California, Division of Environmental Studies, University of California, Davis, California 95616; Research Technician, University of Nevada, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154; and Biologist, Dept. of Transportation, Transportation Laboratory, Dept. of Transportation. State of California, Sacramento, California 95819.
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  • 1

    Paper No. 80119 of the Water Resources Bulletin. Discussions are open until December 1, 1981.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: The fate and effect of sodium chloride applied to Californian highways in the Lake Tahoe, Truckee River, and Yuba River watersheds were studied over a period of 14 months in 1974–75. Chloride levels in streams below major freeways were found to be elevated during the winter. The high chloride levels occurred after the application of salt to roads, decreasing as the time from application increases. Small lakes receiving runoff from major highways were also enriched with chloride. Several of these lakes displayed a temporary chemocline, which was sufficiently strong to stabilize a temperature inversion in one lake.

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