PESTICIDES IN GROUND WATER: DO ATRAZINE METABOLITES MATTER?1

Authors

  • Shiping Liu,

    1. Respectively, Providian Bancorp, 201 Mission St., 13th Floor, San Francisco, California 94105; Lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801; and Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, 400 South Clinton St., Iowa City, Iowa 52244.
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  • Steven T Yen,

    1. Respectively, Providian Bancorp, 201 Mission St., 13th Floor, San Francisco, California 94105; Lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801; and Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, 400 South Clinton St., Iowa City, Iowa 52244.
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  • Dana W. Kolpin

    1. Respectively, Providian Bancorp, 201 Mission St., 13th Floor, San Francisco, California 94105; Lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801; and Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, 400 South Clinton St., Iowa City, Iowa 52244.
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  • 1

    Paper No. 95118 of the Water Resources Bulletin. Discussions are open until February 1, 1997.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Atrazine and atrazine-residue (atrazine + two metabolites - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine) concentrations were examined to determine if consideration of these atrazine metabolites substantially adds to our understanding of the distribution of this pesticide in groundwater of the midcontinental United States. The mean of atrazine.residue concentrations was 53 percent greater than that of atrazine alone for those observations above the detection limit (> 0.05 μg/l). Furthermore, a censored regression analysis using atrazine-residue concentrations revealed significant factors not identified when only atrazine concentrations were used. Thus, knowledge of concentrations of these atrazine metabolites is required to obtain a true estimation of risk of using these aquifers as sources for drinking water, and such knowledge also provides information that ultimately may be important for future management policies designed to reduce atrazine concentrations in ground water.

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