FARM-LEVEL MANAGEMENT OF DEEP PERCOLATION EMISSIONS IN IRRIGATED AGRICULTURE1

Authors

  • Judith F Posnikoff,

    1. Respectively, Visiting Assistant Professor and Professor, Resource Economics, Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521.
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  • Keith C. Knapp

    1. Respectively, Visiting Assistant Professor and Professor, Resource Economics, Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, California 92521.
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  • 1

    Paper No. 95141 of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association (formerly Water Resources Bulletin). Discussions are open until October 1, 1997.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Source control costs for deep percolation emissions from irrigated agriculture are analyzed using a farm-level model. Crop area, irrigation system and applied water are chosen to maximize the net benefits of agricultural production while accounting for the environmental damages and disposal costs of those emissions. Deep percolation is progressively reduced as environmental and disposal costs are increased. This occurs primarily through the adoption of more efficient irrigation technology and reductions in applied water for a given technology Higher surface water prices, such as through irrigation reform and constrained surface supplies, are additionally considered in light of the drainage problem, as are the effects, both short- and long-term, on ground water use.

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