VALUE OF WOODY RWER CORRIDORS IN LEVEE PROTECTION ALONG THE MISSOURI RWER IN 19931

Authors

  • John P Dwyer,

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211; Forester, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, State Office Parkade Center, Columbia, Missouri 65203; and Assistant Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211
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  • Douglas Wallace,

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211; Forester, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, State Office Parkade Center, Columbia, Missouri 65203; and Assistant Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211
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  • David R. Larsen

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211; Forester, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, State Office Parkade Center, Columbia, Missouri 65203; and Assistant Professor, The School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, 1–30 Agriculture Bldg., Columbia, Missouri 65211
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  • 1

    Paper No. 96184 of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association (formerly Water Resources Bulletin). Discussions are open until October 1, 1997.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Following the Midwest flood of 1993, a study was initiated along a 39-mile segment of the Missouri River to determine if there was an association between woody corridors and levee stability. A systematic sample of levee failures revealed that primary levees which did not fail had a significantly wider woody corridor than failed levees. Analysis of the total inventory of failed levees revealed that as the width of the woody corridor decreased, the length of the levee failure increased. Number of levee failures and their severity of damage could be reduced if woody corridors were at least 300 feet wide.

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