TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF RAINFALL OVER CENTRAL AND SOUTH FLORIDA1

Authors

  • Alaa Ali,

    1. Respectively, Senior Engineer, Senior Supervising Engineer, Senior Engineer, and Lead Engineer, Resources Assessment Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406 (E-Mail/Aali: Aali@sfwmd.gov).
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  • Wossenu Abtew,

    1. Respectively, Senior Engineer, Senior Supervising Engineer, Senior Engineer, and Lead Engineer, Resources Assessment Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406 (E-Mail/Aali: Aali@sfwmd.gov).
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  • Stuart Van Horn,

    1. Respectively, Senior Engineer, Senior Supervising Engineer, Senior Engineer, and Lead Engineer, Resources Assessment Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406 (E-Mail/Aali: Aali@sfwmd.gov).
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  • Nagendra Khanal

    1. Respectively, Senior Engineer, Senior Supervising Engineer, Senior Engineer, and Lead Engineer, Resources Assessment Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406 (E-Mail/Aali: Aali@sfwmd.gov).
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  • 1

    Paper No. 99021 of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association.Discussions are open until April 1, 2001.

ABSTRACT:

requency evaluation and spatial characterization of rainfall in Central and South Florida are presented. Point frequency analysis performed at all available sites has shown that the 2-parameter Gamma probability density function is the best model for monthly rainfall frequency over Central and South Florida. The model's parameters estimated at 145 stations were used to provide monthly rainfall estimates for 10- and 100-year dry and wet return periods. Experimental and theoretical variograms computed for these estimates, as well as the Kriging estimation variance maps, show that the existing rain gage network is less capable of resolving monthly rainfall variation in the wet season than the dry season. May is the dry-to-wet transition month, while October is the wet-to-dry transition month with average rainfall of 4.5 inches. Monthly average rainfall is above 7 inches during the wet season and below 3 inches during the dry season. Two-thirds of the annual rainfall is accumulated in the wet season. Annual average rainfall is maximum (above 60 inches) in many areas along the east coast, and is minimum (below 45 inches) in many areas over Lake Okee-chobee and Central Florida. Rainfall maps show a changing pattern between the wet and the dry seasons. Frontal rainfall occurs in the dry season, while convective rainfall, tropical depression, and hurricanes occur in the wet season. Average rainfall is higher along the east coast area in the dry season and it is higher along the west coast area in the wet season.

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