WATER CONSERVATION IN CASABLANCA, MOROCCO1

Authors

  • Mohamed Lahlou,

    1. Respectively, Technical Assistance Specialist, National Drinking Water Clearinghouse, NRCCE Bldg., P.O. Box 6064, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506–6064; and Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6108, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505 (E-Mail/Lahlou: lahloum@hotmail.com).
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  • Dale Colyer

    1. Respectively, Technical Assistance Specialist, National Drinking Water Clearinghouse, NRCCE Bldg., P.O. Box 6064, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506–6064; and Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6108, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505 (E-Mail/Lahlou: lahloum@hotmail.com).
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  • 1

    Paper No. 98138 of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association.Discussions are open until June 1, 2001.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: This study examines water consumption characteristics in Casablanca and analyzes approaches for sustainable water demand management. Research procedures involve the development and estimation of water demand models for the residential/commercial, industrial, and institutional sectors; forecasts of water demand to 2010; and simulation of the effects of a complex of water conservation methods on the forecasted demands. The results indicate that residential/commercial water demand is weakly responsive to price changes (elasticity =−0.448) while institutional water demand is slightly more responsive (elasticity =−0.648). The conservation approaches used in the simulations included public education, plumbing code revisions to require use of water conservation devices, leak detection and repair, pricing policy, metering, and pressure reduction. The results indicate that considerable saving in water use can be attained through a comprehensive water demand management program.

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