CLIMATE SCIENCE AND DROUGHT PLANNING: THE ARIZONA EXPERIENCE1

Authors

  • Katharine L. Jacobs,

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor and Specialist, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science and Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, 350 North Campbell, Tucson, Arizona 85721; Program Manager, CLIMAS, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721; and Associate Director, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (E-Mail/Jacobs: kjacobs@ag.arizona.edu).
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  • Gregg M. Garfin,

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor and Specialist, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science and Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, 350 North Campbell, Tucson, Arizona 85721; Program Manager, CLIMAS, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721; and Associate Director, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (E-Mail/Jacobs: kjacobs@ag.arizona.edu).
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  • Barbara J. Morehouse

    1. Respectively, Associate Professor and Specialist, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science and Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, 350 North Campbell, Tucson, Arizona 85721; Program Manager, CLIMAS, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721; and Associate Director, Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth, University of Arizona, 715 North Park Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (E-Mail/Jacobs: kjacobs@ag.arizona.edu).
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  • 1

    Paper No. 04074 of the Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) (Copyright © 2005). Discussions are open until October 1, 2005.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: In response to recent severe drought conditions throughout the state, Arizona recently developed its first drought plan. The Governor's Drought Task Force focused on limiting the economic and social impacts of future droughts through enhanced adaptation and mitigation efforts. The plan was designed to maximize the use of new, scientific breakthroughs in climate monitoring and prediction and in vulnerability assessment. The long term objective of the monitoring system is to allow for evaluation of conditions in multiple sectors and at multiple scales. Stakeholder engagement and decision support are key objectives in reducing Arizona's vulnerability in light of the potential for severe, sustained drought. The drivers of drought conditions in Arizona include the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

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