SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Literature cited

  • Andersson, M. S., and M. C. De Vicente. 2010. Gene Flow between Crops and Their Wild Relatives. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD.
  • Arnold, M. L. 2006. Evolution through Genetic Exchange. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
  • Ayal, S., and A. A. Levy. 2005. Wheat domestication and de-domestication – What are the odds? In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 167173. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Bagavathiannan, M. V., B. Julier, P. Barre, R. H. Gulden, and R. C. Van Acker. 2010. Genetic diversity of feral alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) populations occurring in Manitoba, Canada and comparison with alfalfa cultivars: an analysis using SSR markers and phenotypic traits. Euphytica 173:419432.
  • Baker, H. G. 1974. The evolution of weeds. Annual Review of Ecology 5:124.
  • Baker, H. G., and G. L. Stebbins. 1965. The Genetics of Colonizing Species. Academic Press, New York, NY.
  • Barney, J. N., and J. M. DiTomaso. 2008. Nonnative species and bioenergy: are we cultivating the next invader? BioScience 58:6470.
  • Barrett, S. H. 1983. Crop mimicry in weeds. Economic Botany 37:255282.
  • Bell, C. E., T. Easely, and K. R. Goodman. 2008. Effective fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) control with herbicides in natural habitats in California. Invasive Plant Science and Management 1:6672.
  • Bervillé, A., M.-H. Muller, B. Poinso, and H. Serieys. 2005. Risks of gene flow between sunflower and other Helianthus species. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 209230. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Blossey, B., and R. Nötzold. 1995. Evolution of increased competitive ability in invasive nonindigenous plants: a hypothesis. Journal of Ecology 83:887889.
  • Bossdorf, O., H. Auge, L. Lafuma, W. E. Rogers, E. Siemann, and D. Prati. 2005. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation between native and introduced plant populations. Oecologia 144:111.
  • Brodersen, C., S. Lavergne, and J. Molofsky. 2008. Genetic variation in photosynthetic characteristics among invasive and native populations of reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea). Biological Invasions 10:13171325.
  • Burger, J. C., and N. C. Ellstrand. 2005. Feral rye – evolutionary origins of a weed. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 175192. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Burger, J. C., S. Lee, and N. C. Ellstrand. 2006. Origin and genetic structure of feral rye in the western United States. Molecular Ecology 15:25272539.
  • Burger, J. C., J. S. Holt, and N. C. Ellstrand. 2007. Rapid phenotypic divergence of feral rye from domesticated cereal rye. Weed Science 55:204271.
  • Campbell, L. G., and A. A. Snow. 2009. Can feral weeds evolve from cultivated radish (Raphanus sativus, Brassicaceae)? American Journal of Botany 96:498506.
  • Campbell, L. G., A. A. Snow, and C. E. Ridley. 2006. Weed evolution after crop gene introgression: greater survival and fecundity of hybrids in a new environment. Ecology Letters 11:11981209.
  • Cao, Q., B.-R. Lu, H. Xia, J. Rong, F. Sala, A. Spada, and F. Grassi. 2006. Genetic diversity and origin of weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) populations found in North-eastern China revealed by simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Annals of Botany 98:12411252.
  • Colautti, R. I., J. L. Maron, and S. C. H. Barrett. 2009. Common garden comparisons of native and introduced plant populations: latitudinal clines can obscure evolutionary inferences. Evolutionary Applications 2:187199.
  • Culley, T. M., and N. A. Hardiman. 2009. The role of intraspecific hybridization in the evolution of invasiveness: a case study of the ornamental pear tree Pyrus calleryana. Biological Invasions 11:11071120.
  • Darmency, H. 2005. Incestuous relations of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) with its parents and cousins. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 8196. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Darwin, C. 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. John Murray, London, UK.
  • Darwin, C. 1868. The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication. John Murray, London, UK.
  • Van Dijk, H. 2004. Gene exchange between wild and crop in Beta vulgaris: how easy is hybridization and what will happen in later generations? In H. C. M.Den Nijs, D.Bartsch, and J.Sweet, eds. Introgression from Genetically Modified Plants into Wild Relatives, pp. 5361. CABI Publishing, Wallingford, UK.
  • Dlugosch, K. M., and I. M. Parker. 2008a. Founding events in species invasions: genetic variation, adaptive evolution, and the role of multiple introductions. Molecular Ecology 17:431449.
  • Dlugosch, K. M., and I. M. Parker. 2008b. Invading populations of an ornamental shrub show rapid life history evolution despite genetic bottlenecks. Ecology Letters 11:701709.
  • Doebley, J., A. Stec, and C. Gustus. 1995. Teosinte branched1 and the origin of maize: evidence for epistasis and the evolution of dominance. Genetics 141:333346.
  • Ehara, K., and S. Abe. 1950. Classification of the forms of Japanese barnyard millet. Proceedings of the Crop Science Society of Japan 20:245246.
  • Ejeta, G., and C. Grenier. 2005. Sorghum and its weedy hybrids. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 123136. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Ellstrand, N. C., and K. Schierenbeck. 2000. Hybridization as a stimulus for the evolution of invasiveness in plants? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 97:70437050.
  • Frost, H. G. 1923. Heterosis and dominance of size factors in Raphanus. Genetics 8:116153.
  • Gealy, D. R. 2005. Gene movement between rice (Oryza sativa) and weedy rice (Oryza sativa) – a U.S. temperate rice perspective. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 323354. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Gepts, P. 2004. Crop domestication as a long-term selection experiment. Plant Breeding Reviews 24:144.
  • Gressel, J. 2005a. Introduction – the challenges of ferality. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 17. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Gressel, J. 2005b. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Hegde, S. G., J. D. Nason, J. Clegg, and N. C. Ellstrand. 2006. The evolution of California’s wild radish has resulted in the extinction of its progenitors. Evolution 60:11871197.
  • Hierro, J. L., J. M. Marron, and R. M. Callaway. 2005. A biogeographical approach to plant invasions: the importance of studying exotics in their introduced and native range. Journal of Ecology 93:515.
  • Hilu, K., J. M. J. De Wet, and D. Seigler. 1978. Flavonoid patterns and systematics in Eleusine. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 6:247249.
  • Holm, L. G., D. L. Plucknett, J. V. Pancho, and J. P. Herberger. 1977. The World’s Worst Weeds: Distribution and Biology. University Press of Hawaii, Honolulu.
  • Holm, L., J. Doll, E. Holm, J. Pancho, and J. Herberger. 1997. World Weeds: Natural Histories and Distribution. John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.
  • Ishikawa, R., N. Toki, K. Imai, Y. I. Sato, H. Yamagishi, Y. Shimamoto, K. Ueno et al. 2005. Origin of weedy rice grown in Bhutan and the force of genetic diversity. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 52:395403.
  • Joshi, A. A., D. Mudappa, and T. R. S. Raman. 2009. Brewing trouble: coffee invasion in relation to edges and forest structure in tropical rainforest fragments of the Western Ghats, India. Biological Invasions 11:23872400.
  • Kaus, A., and A. Gómez Pompa. 1992. Taming the wilderness myth. BioScience 42:271279.
  • Keller, S. R., D. R. Sowell, M. Neiman, L. M. Wolfe, and D. R. Taylor. 2009. Adaptation and colonization history affect the evolution of clines in two introduced species. New Phytologist 183:678690.
  • Kowarik, I. 2005. Urban ornamentals escaped from cultivation. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 97121. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Lavergne, S., and J. Molofsky. 2004. Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) as a biological model in the study of plant invasions. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 23:415429.
  • Leak-Garcia, J. A. 2009. Genetic origins and the evolution of invasiveness of Cynara cardunculus in California. PhD dissertation in Genetics, Genomics, and Bioinformatics. University of California, Riverside, California, USA.
  • Levin, D. A. 1978. The origin of isolating mechanisms in flowering plants. Evolutionary Biology 11:185317.
  • Londo, J. P., and B. A. Schaal. 2007. Origins and population genetics of weedy red rice in the USA. Molecular Ecology 16:45234535.
  • Lowe, S., M. Browne, S. Boudjelas, and M. De Poorter. 2000. 100 of the World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species: A Selection from the Global Invasive Species Database. The Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) a specialist group of the Species Survival Commission (SSC) of the World Conservation Union (IUCN).
  • Moloney, K. A., C. Holzapfel, K. Tielbörger, F. Jeltsch, and F. M. Schurr. 2009. Rethinking the common garden in invasion research. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 11:311320.
  • Morrell, P. L., T. D. Williams-Coplin, A. L. Lattu, J. E. Bowers, J. M. Chandler, and A. H. Paterson. 2005. Crop-to-weed introgression has impacted allelic composition of johnsongrass populations with and without recent exposure to cultivated sorghum. Molecular Ecology 14:21432154.
  • Mücher, T., P. Hesse, M. Pohl-Orf, N. C. Ellstrand, and D. Bartsch. 2000. Characterization of weed beet in Germany and Italy. Journal of Sugar Beet Research 37:1938.
  • National Research Council. 1989. Field Testing Genetically Modified Organisms: Framework for Decisions. National Academy Press, Washington.
  • Novak, S. J. 2007. The role of evolution in the invasion process. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 104:36713672.
  • Panetsos, C. A., and H. G. Baker. 1967. The origin of variation in “wild”Raphanus sativus (Cruciferae) in California. Genetica 38:243274.
  • Paterson, A. H. 2002. What has QTL mapping taught us about plant domestication? New Phytologist 154:591608.
  • Paterson, A. H., K. F. Schertz, Y. R. Lin, S.-C. Liu, and Y.-L. Chang. 1995. The weediness of wild plants: molecular analysis of genes influencing dispersal and persistence of johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 92:61276131.
  • Prentis, P. J., J. R. U. Wilson, E. E. Dormontt, D. M. Richardson, and A. J. Lowe. 2008. Adaptive evolution in invasive species. Trends in Plant Sciences 13:288294.
  • Pritchard, J. K., M. Stephens, and P. Donnelly. 2000. Inference of population structure using multilocus genotypic data. Genetics 155:945959.
  • Purugganan, M. D., and D. Q. Fuller. 2009. The nature of selection under plant domestication. Nature 457:843848.
  • Ridley, C. E., and N. C. Ellstrand. 2009. Evolution of enhanced reproduction in the hybrid-derived invasive, California wild radish (Raphanus sativus). Biological Invasions 11:22512264.
  • Ridley, C. E., S.-C. Kim, and N. C. Ellstrand. 2008. Bidirectional history of hybridization in California wild radish, Raphanus sativus (Brassicaceae), as revealed by chloroplast DNA. American Journal of Botany 95:14371442.
  • Ross-Ibarra, J., P. L. Morrell, and B. S. Gaut. 2007. Plant domestication, a unique opportunity to identify the genetic basis of adaptation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 104:86418648.
  • Schierenbeck, K. A., and N. C. Ellstrand. 2009. Hybridization and the evolution of invasiveness in plants and other organisms. Biological Invasions 11:10931105.
  • Sharma, G. P., A. S. Raghubanshi, and J. S. Singh. 2005. Lantana invasion: an overview. Weed Biology and Management 5:157165.
  • Smartt, J., and N. W. Simmonds. 1995. Evolution of Crop Plants, 2nd edn. Longman, Harlow, UK.
  • Snow, A. A., and L. G. Campbell. 2005. Can feral radishes become weeds? In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 193208. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Stace, C. A., and J. P. Bailey. 1999. The value of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) in plant taxonomic and evolutionary studies. In P. M.Hollingsworth, R. M.Bateman, and R. J.Gornall, eds. Molecular Systematics and Plant Evolution, pp. 199210. Taylor & Francis, London, UK.
  • Sun, Q., Z. Ni, Z. Liu, J. Gao, and T. Huang. 1998. Genetic relationships and diversity among Tibetan wheat, common wheat and European spelt wheat revealed by RAPD markers. Euphytica 99:205211.
  • Suneson, C. A., K. O. Rachie, and G. S. Khush. 1969. A dynamic population of weedy rye. Crop Science 9:121124.
  • Valverde, B. E. 2005. The damage by weedy rice – can feral rice remain undetected? In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 279294. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Vaughan, D. A., P. L. Sanchez, J. Ushiki, A. Kaga, and N. Tomooka. 2005. Asian rice and weedy rice – evolutionary perspectives. In J.Gressel, ed. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism, pp. 257277. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Venable, D. L. 2007. Bet hedging in a guild of desert annuals. Ecology 88:10861090.
  • De Wet, J. M. J. 1995. Finger millet. In J.Smartt, and N. W.Simmonds, eds. Evolution of Crop Plants, 2nd edn, pp. 137140. Longman, Harlow, UK.
  • De Wet, J. M. J., and J. R. Harlan. 1975. Weeds and domesticates: evolution in the man-made habitat. Economic Botany 29:99107.
  • De Wet, J. M. J., K. E. Prasada Rao, D. E. Brink, and M. H. Mengesha. 1984. Systematics and evolution of Eleusine coracana (gramineae). American Journal of Botany 71:550557.
  • Whitson, T. 2006. Weeds of the West. Western Society of Weed Science, Newark, CA.
  • Xu, C.-Y., M. H. Julien, M. Fatemi, C. Girod, R. D. Van Klinken, C. L. Gross, and S. J. Novak. 2010. Phenotypic divergence during the invasion of Phyla canescens in Australia and France: evidence for selection-driven evolution. Ecology Letters 13:3244.
  • Zhang, L., A. S. Peek, D. Dunams, and B. S. Gaut. 2002. Population genetics of duplicated disease defense genes, hm1 and hm2, in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) and its wild ancestor (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis). Genetics 162:851860.