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Pneumococcal carriage is more common in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic young men

Authors


  • Authorship
    UJ participated in carrying out the study, collecting and analysing the data and writing the paper, RJ in designing and carrying out the study and collecting the data, AB in designing the study and analysing the data, S S-K in designing and carrying out the study, TK in carrying out the study, HK in writing the paper, AP in designing the study, and AS, OV, TH and ML in designing the study and writing the paper.

  • Ethics
    All the investigations involving humans were reviewed by the appropriate ethics committee and performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in an appropriate version of the 2000 Declaration of Helsinki.

  • Conflict of interest
    The authors have stated explicitly that there are no conflicts of interest in connection with this article.

Ulla Jounio, MD, Department of Medical Microbiology, PO Box 5000, 90014
University of Oulu
Onlu, Finland.
Tel: +358 8 537 5877
Fax: +358 8 537 5908
email: ujounio@paju.oulu.fi

Abstract

Introduction:  The aim was to investigate the prevalence of oropharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Neisseria meningitidis and beta-haemolytic streptococci among asthmatic and non-asthmatic young Finnish men and to identify putative risk factors.

Objectives:  A total of 224 asthmatics and 668 non-asthmatic men (mean age 19.6 years) from two intakes of conscripts to the Kainuu Brigade, Finland in July 2004 and January 2005 were enrolled upon entering military service.

Methods:  Oropharyngeal specimens were examined for bacteria by routine culture methods. All the participants filled in questionnaires concerning risk factors for asthma and respiratory infections.

Results: S. pneumoniae (48 cases, 5.4%), Group A streptococci (16, 1.8%), H. influenzae (45, 5.0%), M. catarrhalis (24, 2.7%) and N. meningitidis (20, 2.2%) were isolated from the 892 participants. Ten putative risk factors for oropharyngeal colonization (asthma, atopy, allergic rhinitis, smoking, current use of asthma medication, history of adeno/tonsillectomy, level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein, peak expiratory flow, results of a 12-min running test and body mass index) were evaluated. The only significant risk factor for S. pneumoniae carriage was asthma (OR, 2.04; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.72).

Conclusions:  Pneumococcal carriage is more common in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic young men.

Please cite this paper as: Jounio U, Juvonen R, Bloigu A, Silvennoinen-Kassinen S, Kaijalainen T, Kauma H, Peitso A, Saukkoriipi A, Vainio O, Harju T and Leinonen M. Pneumococcal carriage is more common in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic young men. The Clinical Respiratory Journal 2010; 4: 222–229.

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