The effect of bovine colostrum on viral upper respiratory tract infections in children with immunoglobulin A deficiency

Authors

  • Türkan Patıroğlu,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
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  • Meda Kondolot

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Social Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
      Meda Kondolot, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Social Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, 38010, Kayseri, Turkey., Tel: +90 437 49 37, Fax: +90 352 437 58 25, email: medakondolot@yahoo.com
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  • Authorship and contributorship Türkan Patıroğlu designed the study and collected data. Meda Kondolot performed the study, collected and analysed data and wrote the paper.

  • Ethics This study was approved by the Erciyes University School of Medicine Ethics Committee.

  • Conflict of interest The authors have stated explicitly that there are no conflicts of interest in connection with this article.

Meda Kondolot, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Social Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, 38010, Kayseri, Turkey., Tel: +90 437 49 37, Fax: +90 352 437 58 25, email: medakondolot@yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction:  Immunoglobulin A (IgA)-deficient patients predominantly suffer from respiratory and gastrointestinal infections since secretory IgA has important functions to protect mucosal surfaces.

Objective:  To evaluate the effect of bovine colostrum, rich in IgA, on the treatment of viral upper respiratory tract (URT) infections in IgA-deficient children.

Methods:  Thirty-one IgA-deficient children with viral URT infections were included in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, and randomly oral bovine colostrum or placebo was given three times a day for 1 week. Samples of saliva IgA were collected before treatment, after the administration of the first dose, and after the last dose. Mothers of the children completed a daily questionnaire regarding the severity of the infection and any adverse effects.

Results:  The bovine colostrum group had a lower infection severity score than the placebo group after 1 week (respectively 0.81 ± 0.83, 3.00 ± 1.85; P = 0.000), but there was no difference between the salivary IgA levels of the groups.

Conclusion:  This is the first study to evaluate the effect of bovine colostrum in IgA-deficient children, and no adverse effects were observed. However, further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of bovine colostrum in IgA-deficient patients.

Please cite this paper as: Patıroğlu T and Kondolot M. The effect of bovine colostrum on viral upper respiratory tract infections in children with immunoglobulin A deficiency. Clin Respir J 2013; 7: 21–26.

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