Creatine Monohydrate as a Therapeutic Aid in Muscular Dystrophy

Authors

  • Jared P. Pearlman BS,

    1. Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
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  • Roger A. Fielding PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
      Director, Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, 711 Washington St., Boston, MA 02111; Phone: 617–556–3016; Fax: 617–556–3083; E-mail: roger.fielding@tufts.edu.
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Director, Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, 711 Washington St., Boston, MA 02111; Phone: 617–556–3016; Fax: 617–556–3083; E-mail: roger.fielding@tufts.edu.

Abstract

In recent years, dietary supplementation with creatine has been shown to enhance neuromuscular function in several diseases. Recent studies have suggested that creatine can be beneficial in patients with muscular dystrophy and other mitochondrial cytopathies, and may attenuate sarcopenia and facilitate rehabilitation of disuse atrophy. Though the mechanisms are still unknown, creatine has been shown to decrease cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and increase intramuscular and cerebral phosphocreatine stores, providing potential musculoskeletal and neuroprotective effects.

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