Relationship between smoking and metabolic syndrome

Authors

  • Hellas Cena,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Applied Health Sciences, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
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  • Maria Luisa Fonte,

    1. Department of Applied Health Sciences, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
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  • Giovanna Turconi

    1. Department of Applied Health Sciences, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Correction Volume 71, Issue 4, 255, Article first published online: 1 April 2013

  • Affiliations: H Cena, ML Fonte, and G Turconi are with the Department of Applied Health Sciences, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy

H Cena, Department of Applied Health Sciences, Section of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 21, Pavia 27100, Italy. E-mail: hcena@unipv.it, Phone: +39-0382-987542, Fax: +39-0382-987570.

Abstract

Obesity and smoking are important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The diseases and conditions associated with smoking make tobacco use one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In the World Health Organization European region, overweight and obesity are responsible for many chronic diseases, causing more than one million deaths each year. Smoking cessation is associated with a significantly reduced mortality risk in every body-mass-index group. Reductions in smoking and obesity would increase both the psychophysical well-being of the population and its economic productivity; it would also reduce the direct costs of pharmacological therapies and other forms of treatment. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate how tobacco smoking and obesity interact to reduce life expectancy, and to offer a comprehensive view of this issue that should be useful for clinical practice.

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