Clinical and microbiological analysis of periodontally diseased sites after renal transplant

Authors

  • Mara L.S.O. Vieira DDS, MScD,

    1. Assistant Professor, Graduate Periodontology, School of Dentistry, University of RibeiraTo Preto, SaTo Paulo, Brazil
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  • Walter Martins Jr. DDS, DSc,

    1. Professor, Graduate Periodontology, School of Dentistry, University of RibeiraTo Preto, SaTo Paulo, Brazil
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  • Marcio F.M. Grisi DDS, DSc,

    1. Professor, Graduate Periodontology, School of Dentistry at RibeiraTo Preto, University of SaTo Paulo, SaTo Paulo, Brazil
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  • Arthur B. Novaes Jr. DDS, DSc,

    1. Chairman, Graduate Periodontology, School of Dentistry at RibeiraTo Preto, University of SaTo Paulo, SaTo Paulo, Brazil
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  • Sergio L.S. Souza DDS, DSc,

    1. Professor, Graduate Periodontology, School of Dentistry at RibeiraTo Preto, University of SaTo Paulo, SaTo Paulo, Brazil
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  • Sérgio L. Salvador PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Professor, Department of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Department of Health Sciences, University of SaTo Paulo, Av. do Café s/n, RibeiraTo Preto, SaTo Paulo, Brazil 14040-903
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*sldssalv@usp.br

Abstract

This study compared the clinical and microbiological status of periodontally diseased sites in 42 patients who had a renal transplant and were undergoing immunosuppressive therapy (21 taking azathioprin and corticosteroids [Az-C] and 21 taking cyclosporin-A [Cy-A] with those of 21 systemically healthy matched controls. Probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP) and gingival hyperplasia (GH) were measured at 339 sites. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and/or Bacteroides forsythus using the BANA test. Our findings suggest that immunosuppressed patients showed significantly less inflammation and fewer putative anaerobic pathogens using the BANA test, and that patients undergoing therapy with cyclosporin-A have a higher frequency of sites with gingival hyperplasia when compared with patients medicated with azathioprin or corticosteroids.

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