Hot tips on hot tips: Technical problems with percutaneous insertion of a microwave antenna through rigid tissue

Authors

  • Luke A Danaher,

    1. Departments of Medical Imaging Research and Education, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Medical Imaging, The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, QLD, Australia
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  • Karin Steinke

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Medical Imaging, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    • Departments of Medical Imaging Research and Education, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia
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  • L A Danaher BAppSc (MRT), MBBS; K Steinke MD, PhD.
  • Conflict of interest: None.

Correspondence

Associate Professor Karin Steinke, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Level 3 Ned Hanlon Building, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia.

Email: karin.steinke@gmail.com

Summary

We report an instance of microwave antenna breakage upon insertion through rigid costal cartilage and tip dislodgement during withdrawal of the antenna. Furthermore, we highlight antenna incompatibility with certain coaxial needles. Given the complexity and fragility of microwave antennas, it is not recommended to insert them through rigid tissue such as cartilage or calcified pleural plaques.

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