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Effect of ellagitannins, ellagic acid and volatile compounds from oak wood on the (+)-catechin, procyanidin B1 and malvidin-3-glucoside content of model wines

Authors

  • A.M. JORDÃO,

    1. Departamento das Indústrias Agro-Alimentares, Escola Superior Agrária de Viseu, Estrada de Nelas, Quinta da Alagoa, 3500-606 Viseu, Portugal
    2. Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Laboratório Ferreira Lapa (Sector de Enologia), 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
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  • J.M. RICARDO-DA-SILVA,

    Corresponding author
    1. Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Laboratório Ferreira Lapa (Sector de Enologia), 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
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  • O. LAUREANO,

    1. Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Laboratório Ferreira Lapa (Sector de Enologia), 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
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  • W. MULLEN,

    1. Plant Products and Human Nutrition Group, Graham Kerr Building, Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Faculty of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK
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  • A. CROZIER

    1. Plant Products and Human Nutrition Group, Graham Kerr Building, Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Faculty of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK
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Professor Dr Jorge M. Ricardo-da-Silva, fax +351 213653200, email jricardosil@isa.utl.pt

Abstract

Background and Aims:  During ageing in oak barrels, wine undergoes changes because of the release of polyphenols and other molecules from wood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of some oak wood-derived volatile compounds, ellagic acid and oak wood extracts on the levels of (+)-catechin, procyanidin B1 and malvidin-3-glucoside.

Methods and Results:  Phenolics and the oak wood derived volatile compounds studied were quantified by HPLC and by GC, respectively. Additionally, the new compounds formed in the solutions were characterised by their spectral properties. Ellagic acid and/or oak wood extracts slowed the decline in the levels of (+)-catechin and procyanidin B1. In contrast, the decrease in malvidin-3-glucoside was more pronounced in the presence of ellagic acid and oak wood chip extracts. Furfural slowed (+)-catechin degradation, while breakdown of malvidin-3-glucoside was slightly more pronounced in the presence of guaiacol, furfural, vanillin and eugenol. (+)-Catechin, procyanidin B1 and malvidin-3-glucoside did not significantly affect the rate of the degradation of ellagitannins during the storage time studied. Finally, new HPLC peaks were detected in the solutions containing (+)-catechin and ellagic acid, as well as with malvidin-3-glucoside with ellagic acid and oak wood extract.

Conclusions:  Malvidin 3-glucoside and (+)-catechin and procyanidin B1 presented distinct behaviours during time in the presence of volatile and non-volatile compounds from oak wood.

Significance of the Study:  This work points out the importance of oak wood components in the degradation of anthocyanins and tannins, as well as the reactions that occur during the ageing of red wine.

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