Get access

Plant DNA barcodes and the influence of gene flow

Authors

  • YAMAMA NACIRI,

    1. Unité de Phylogénie et de Génétique Moléculaires, Conservatoire et Jardin botaniques de la Ville de Genève, Chemin de l’Impératrice 1, 1292 Chambésy, Switzerland
    2. Laboratoire de Systématique Végétale et Biodiversité, Université de Genève, Chemin de l’Impératrice 1, 1292 Chambésy, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SOFIA CAETANO,

    1. Unité de Phylogénie et de Génétique Moléculaires, Conservatoire et Jardin botaniques de la Ville de Genève, Chemin de l’Impératrice 1, 1292 Chambésy, Switzerland
    2. Laboratoire de Systématique Végétale et Biodiversité, Université de Genève, Chemin de l’Impératrice 1, 1292 Chambésy, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • NICOLAS SALAMIN

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
    2. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Génopode, Quartier Sorge, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author

  • OPINION

Yamama Naciri, Fax: +41-22-418-51-01; E-mail: yamama.naciri@ville-ge.ch

Abstract

Success of species assignment using DNA barcodes has been shown to vary among plant lineages because of a wide range of different factors. In this study, we confirm the theoretical prediction that gene flow influences species assignment with simulations and a literature survey. We show that the genome experiencing the highest gene flow is, in the majority of the cases, the best suited for species delimitation. Our results clearly suggest that, for most angiosperm groups, plastid markers will not be the most appropriate for use as DNA barcodes. We therefore advocate shifting the focus from plastid to nuclear markers to achieve an overall higher success using DNA barcodes.

Ancillary