Evaluating the Angina Plan in Patients Admitted to Hospital with Angina: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Authors


Correspondence
Dr. Stella Zetta, Thettalon 19, Karditsa, 43100, Greece.
Tel.: 00302441029380;
E-mail: skzetta@aim.com

Abstract

The aim of this trial was to evaluate the Angina Plan (AP), a cognitive-behavioral nurse-facilitated self-help intervention against standard care (SC). A randomized controlled trial of 218 patients hospitalized with angina assessed participants predischarge and 6 months later. Data were collected during a structured interview using validated questionnaires, self-report, and physiological measurement to assess between group changes in mood, knowledge and misconceptions, cardiovascular risk, symptoms, quality of life, and health service utilization. The intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis found no reliable effects on anxiety and depression at 6 months. AP participants reported increased knowledge, less misconceptions, reduced body mass index (BMI), an increase in self-reported exercise, less functional limitation, and improvements in general health perceptions and social and leisure activities compared to those receiving SC. Sensitivity analysis excluding participants with high baseline depression revealed a statistical significant reduction in depression levels in AP compared to the SC participants. Analysis excluding participants receiving cardiac surgery or angioplasty removed the ITT effects on physical limitation, self-reported exercise and general health perceptions and the improvements seen in social and leisure activities, while adaptive effects on knowledge, misconceptions and BMI remained and between-group changes in depression approached significance. Initiating the AP in a secondary care setting for patients with new and existing angina produces similar benefits to those reported in newly diagnosed primary care patients. Further evaluation is required to examine the extent of observed effects in the longer term.

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