Gender, delinquency, and the Great Depression: a test of power-control theory

Authors

  • BILL MCCARTHY,

    1. University of Toronto
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    • *This study was made possible by funding from the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada. We also thank the Centre of Criminology at the University of Toronto for its assistance, as well as the anonymous CRSA reviewers, the CRSA sociology editor, Bruce Arnold, and Ana Bettencourt for their comments and suggestions. We assume full responsibility for the results and interpretations presented here. The manuscript was received in May, 1986 and accepted July, 1986.

  • JOHN HAGAN

    1. University of Toronto
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    • *This study was made possible by funding from the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada. We also thank the Centre of Criminology at the University of Toronto for its assistance, as well as the anonymous CRSA reviewers, the CRSA sociology editor, Bruce Arnold, and Ana Bettencourt for their comments and suggestions. We assume full responsibility for the results and interpretations presented here. The manuscript was received in May, 1986 and accepted July, 1986.


Abstract

Dans cet article, nous 6tudions comment la relation entre sexe et ddinquence a variC, des annees pr6cCdant la Grande DPpression i celles qui l'ont suivie, en passant par les annies mOmes de la Crise. Nos donnkes sont tirCes de rapports de tribunaux de Toronto; nous testons plusieurs facons d'expliquer les changements observk, en nous basant sur la theorie du 'contrble-pouvoir' et sur d'autres thkories. Les rbultats de l'analyse montrent qu'une theorie modifee du 'contrde-pouvoir' explique adbquatement la variation. 11s encouragent aussi la poursuite de l'ktude de la variation dans le temps de la relation entre sexe et delinquence.

Using data from Toronto court reports, this paper examines variation in the genderdelinquency relationship before, during, and after the Great Depression. It tests a variety of possible explanations for observed changes in this relationship drawn from power-control theory and other theoretical perspectives. Results of the data analysis support a revised power-control theory and encourage further exploration of variation in the gender-delinquency relationship across time.

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