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Structural alterations of faecal and mucosa-associated bacterial communities in irritable bowel syndrome

Authors

  • Ana Durbán,

    1. Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP), Avenida de Cataluña 21, 46020, Valencia, Spain.
    2. Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Valencia, Spain.
    3. CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Spain.
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  • Juan J. Abellán,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP), Avenida de Cataluña 21, 46020, Valencia, Spain.
    2. Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Valencia, Spain.
    3. CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Spain.
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  • Nuria Jiménez-Hernández,

    1. Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP), Avenida de Cataluña 21, 46020, Valencia, Spain.
    2. Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Valencia, Spain.
    3. CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Spain.
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  • Patricia Salgado,

    1. School of Biological Sciences, University of California, Irvine and Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training (MHIRT), Irvine, California, USA.
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  • Marta Ponce,

    1. Servicio de Medicina Digestiva, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Avenida de Campanar 21, 46009 Valencia, Spain.
    2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBER-EHD), Spain.
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  • Julio Ponce,

    1. Servicio de Medicina Digestiva, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Avenida de Campanar 21, 46009 Valencia, Spain.
    2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBER-EHD), Spain.
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  • Vicente Garrigues,

    1. Servicio de Medicina Digestiva, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Avenida de Campanar 21, 46009 Valencia, Spain.
    2. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBER-EHD), Spain.
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  • Amparo Latorre,

    1. Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP), Avenida de Cataluña 21, 46020, Valencia, Spain.
    2. Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Valencia, Spain.
    3. CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Spain.
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  • Andrés Moya

    1. Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP), Avenida de Cataluña 21, 46020, Valencia, Spain.
    2. Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universitat de València, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Valencia, Spain.
    3. CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBEResp), Spain.
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E-mail abellan_jua@gva.es; Tel. (+34) 961 925 917; Fax (+34) 961 925 978.

Summary

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder in western countries. Previous studies on IBS, mostly based on faecal samples, suggest alterations in the intestinal microbiota. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the association between specific bacteria and IBS. We explore the alterations of intestinal bacterial communities in IBS using massive sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA genes. Mucosal biopsies of the ascending and descending colon and faeces from 16 IBS patients and 9 healthy controls were analysed. Strong inter-individual variation was observed in the composition of the bacterial communities in both patients and controls. These communities showed less diversity in IBS cases. There were larger differences in the microbiota composition between biopsies and faeces than between patients and controls. We found a few over-represented and under-represented taxa in IBS cases with respect to controls. The detected alterations varied by site, with no changes being consistent across sample types.

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