Monitoring for Nutrition Results in ICDS: Translating Vision into Action

Authors

  • Saroj K. Adhikari,

    1. Assistant Director, Ministry of Women and Child Development, Government of India (saroj65@yahoo.com).
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      The authors gratefully acknowledge the generous advice of Ashi K. Kathuria, Meera Shekar, Mohini Kak, Sunil Babu, Sridhar Srikantiah and V. Ramesh Babu. The findings, interpretations and conclusions expressed in this article are entirely those of the authors and should not be attributed in any manner to the Ministry of Women and Child Development, the Government of India, or the World Bank, its affiliated organisations or members of its Board of Executive Directors or the countries they represent.

  • Caryn Bredenkamp

    1. Health Specialist, Health Nutrition and Population Unit, Human Development Network, World Bank (cbredenkamp@worldbank.org), where she works on issues related to healthcare financing, and monitoring and evaluation.
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    • *

      The authors gratefully acknowledge the generous advice of Ashi K. Kathuria, Meera Shekar, Mohini Kak, Sunil Babu, Sridhar Srikantiah and V. Ramesh Babu. The findings, interpretations and conclusions expressed in this article are entirely those of the authors and should not be attributed in any manner to the Ministry of Women and Child Development, the Government of India, or the World Bank, its affiliated organisations or members of its Board of Executive Directors or the countries they represent.


Abstract

This article focuses on the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), India's largest nutrition and early child development programme. It describes the political, organisational and technical challenges to building and sustaining an outcomes-oriented approach to nutrition monitoring in India. We show that the environment is conducive to strengthening nutrition programme monitoring and evaluation. Political commitment is growing, financial allocations have increased and there have been a number of reforms to strengthen the ICDS monitoring systems, but weaknesses remain. The article analyses seven technical challenges to improving the outcomes-orientation of ICDS and suggests steps that could be taken to improve monitoring.

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