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Cost Implications of African Swine Fever in Smallholder Farrow-to-Finish Units: Economic Benefits of Disease Prevention Through Biosecurity

Authors

  • F. O. Fasina,

    1.  Section of Pig Health, Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa
    2.  Mammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, Pretoria, South Africa
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  • D. D. Lazarus,

    1.  African swine fever Project Implementation Task Team, National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria
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  • B. T. Spencer,

    1.  Section of Pig Health, Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa
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  • A. A. Makinde,

    1.  African swine fever Project Implementation Task Team, National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria
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  • A. D. S. Bastos

    1.  Mammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, Pretoria, South Africa
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F. O. Fasina, Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa. Tel.: +27 12 529 8069; Fax: +27 12 529 8396; E-mail: daydupe2003@yahoo.co.uk

Summary

African swine fever remains the greatest limitation to the development of the pig industry in Africa, and parts of Asia and Europe. It is especially important in West and Central African countries where the disease has become endemic. Biosecurity is the implementation of a set of measures that reduce the risk of infection through segregation, cleaning and disinfection. Using a 122-sow piggery unit, a financial model and costing were used to estimate the economic benefits of effective biosecurity against African swine fever. The outcomes suggest that pig production is a profitable venture that can generate a profit of approximately US$109 637.40 per annum and that an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) has the potential to cause losses of up to US$910 836.70 in a single year. The implementation of biosecurity and its effective monitoring can prevent losses owing to ASF and is calculated to give a benefit-cost ratio of 29. A full implementation of biosecurity will result in a 9.70% reduction in total annual profit, but is justified in view of the substantial costs incurred in the event of an ASF outbreak. Biosecurity implementation is robust and capable of withstanding changes in input costs including moderate feed price increases, higher management costs and marginal reductions in total outputs. It is concluded that biosecurity is a key to successful pig production in an endemic situation.

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