ETHNIC RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION IN BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND, 1971–1991*

Authors

  • Dr. PAUL DOHERTY,

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      Dr. Doherty is a lecturer in history, philosophy, and politics at the University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland BT37 oQB.

  • Dr. MICHAEL A. POOLE

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      Dr. Poole is a senior lecturer in environmental studies at the University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1sa.


  • *

    We adapted the 1991 data from the Northern Ireland Census 1991 small-area statistics by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office and the Department of Finance and Personnel. Other census material © Crown Copyright 1994. We acknowledge the financial assistance that enabled us to purchase the data sets used in this study. The 1971 data were purchased by the Department of Geography, Queen's University, Belfast. The 1981 data were purchased by the Department of Environmental Studies, University of Ulster. The 1991 data were purchased through a grant from the European Social Fund Training Programme in Research Methods for a project entitled “Ethnic Residential Segregation in Belfast, 1971–1991.” We also acknowledge the most useful comments of Adrian Moore and the anonymous referees in the preparation of this article.

Abstract

ABSTRACT. The segregation of Catholics and Protestants varies spatially and temporally in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Using small-area statistics from the censuses of 1971, 1981, and 1991, taken during the recent “Troubles,” a strongly rising level of ethnic segregation is noted for the 1970s, followed by a more gentle rise in the 1980s. Segregation is shown to vary among subunits of the urban area. The basic cause of this segregation is ethnic violence, and the spatial variation in segregation can be attributed to spatial variation in this violence.

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