HABITAT ISLANDS AND THE PRESERVATION OF NEW ZEALAND'S AVIFAUNA*

Authors


  • *

    Appreciation is extended to the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board and to the New Zealand-United States Educational Foundation for their generous support of the primary author's field research in New Zealand; also to the Department of Geography at the University of Auckland, especially its cartographic staff, for their material assistance with the project, and to various personnel of the New Zealand Department of Conservation and the Auckland Regional Council for their insightful information and suggestions.

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Numerous avifauna species face extinction on New Zealand's two main islands, owing largely to forest clearance and to introduced mammals. In response, New Zealand selects certain offshore islands for the relocation of threatened native birds, first purging them of mammalian predators. Over the past few decades, this procedure has evolved to become fairly successful. Protected habitat “islands” within mainland forested areas are also being created, but with success less certain. As historic habitats are lost, small biopreservation islands may become a standard mechanism for protecting threatened species, a process that can be termed the “miniaturization” of nature.

Ancillary