BEEKEEPING AND LOCAL SELF-RELIANCE IN RURAL SOUTHERN AFRICA*

Authors

  • Pete M. Illgner,

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      Mr. Illgner is a doctoral student in zoology and entomology at Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa 6140, where Dr. Nel is a senior lecturer in geography and Mr. Robertson is a master's student at the Albany Museum.

  • Etienne L. Nel,

  • Mark P. Robertson


  • *

    The authors wish to acknowledge the assistance in the field of members of the Bondolfi Beekeeper's Association, especially Mr. Mutude and Mr. Thomas Akom Chale, the United Nations volunteer. The financial support of Prof. Randall Hepburn and the comments of Dr. Tony Binns on the document are gratefully acknowledged.

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Beekeeping has the potential to supplement incomes in rural southern Africa. In light of regional economic constraints, self-reliance strategies that draw on local knowledge and skills take on a renewed importance. We consider the advantages and disadvantages of beekeeping and examine appropriate forms of development support. A short case study from Zimbabwe illustrates these issues.

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