CHIRICAHUA APACHE HOMELAND IN THE BORDERLAND SOUTHWEST

Authors


  • I thank Karen Hayes of Salt Lake City, Utah, for permission to reproduce one of her photographs from Sierra Madre Revisited and for permission to quote from her unpublished manuscript, “Apache Pilgrimage: Searching the Past for the Future.” I also thank Jay Van Orden, co-organizer and participant photographic historian of the 1988 Sierra Madre journey, for speaking with me about that pilgrimage and sharing information about the 1986 Centennial at Fort Bowie.

abstract.

The creation of the present United States-Mexico boundary in the mid-nineteenth century interrupted and disregarded the traditional territorial space of the Chiricahua Apache, whose ancestral homeland transcended this new line. As a result of their land claims, the United States created a reservation for the Chiricahua Apache, but it was later withdrawn. Today members of this group officially reside among Mescalero Apache in New Mexico and Fort Sill Apache in Oklahoma. This essay assesses the historic and contemporary impact of geographical borderland changes for the Chiricahua Apache and discusses the legacy of a transformed homeland.

Ancillary