AN EMPIRICAL EXAMINATION OF THE UNDERLYING DIMENSIONS OF PURCHASING COMPETENCE

Authors

  • RAM NARASIMHAN,

    1. Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Eli Broad Graduate School of Management, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1122, USA
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      Ram Narasimhan is distinguished professor of operations and supply chain management in the Eli Broad Graduate School of Business at Michigan State University. Dr. Narasimhan earned his PH.D. from the University of Minnesota. His research interests include supply chain management, environmental issues, quality management, and manufacturing strategy.

  • JAYANTH JAY ARAM,

    1. Department of Decision Sciences, Charles H. Lundquist College of Business, 1208 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-1208, USA
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      Jayanth Jayaram is an assistant professor of decision sciences at the University of Oregon. Dr. Jayaram earned his PH.D. from Michigan State University. His current research interests include supply chain management, strategic purchasing, new product development, and time-based competition.

  • AND JOSEPH R. CARTER

    1. Purchasing and Logistics Management Program, Department of Business Administration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-3706, USA
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      Joseph R. Carter is university professor of supply management, National Association of Purchasing Management (NAPM) professor in the College of Business Administration, and chair of the Supply Chain Management Department at Arizona State University. Dr. Carter earned his D.B.A. from the Boston University Graduate School of Management.


Abstract

The importance of evaluating the effectiveness of the purchasing function in firms along multiple criteria has attracted considerable attention. However, few studies have identified the defining elements that constitute purchasing competence. This paper introduces the construct of purchasing competence using a second-order factor structure derived from purchasing practices identified from the literature. The validity of the construct (purchasing competence) is tested using data from a sample of 179 firms. The results indicate (1) the construct validity of purchasing competence and (2) the predictive validity of purchasing competence, which has a significant positive influence on total quality management performance and customer satisfaction. The implications of these findings for additional research are discussed.

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