Lot Sizing for Optimal Collection and Use of Remanufacturable Returns over a Finite Life-Cycle

Authors

  • Atalay Atasu,

    Corresponding author
    1. INSEAD, Boulevard de Constance, 77300 France Industrial & Systems Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3131, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sila Çetinkaya

    Corresponding author
    1. INSEAD, Boulevard de Constance, 77300 France Industrial & Systems Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3131, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

2atalay.atasu@insead.edu

3sila@tamu.edu

Abstract

Reverse supply chains process used product returns to recover value by re-processing them via remanufacturing operations. When remanufacturing is feasible, the longer the return flows are delayed during the active (primary) market demand period of the product, the lower the value that can be recovered through these operations. In fact, in order to recover the highest value from remanufactured products, the collection rates, return timings, and reusability rates should be matched with the active market demand and supply. With these motivations, this paper is aimed at developing analytical models for the efficient use of returns in making production, inventory, and remanufacturing decisions during the active market. More specifically, we consider a stylistic setting where a collector collects used product returns and ships them to the manufacturer who, in turn, recovers value by remanufacturing and supplies products during the active market demand. Naturally, the manufacturer's production, inventory and remanufacturing decisions and costs are influenced by the timing and quantity of the collector's shipments of used product returns. Hence, we investigate the impact of the timing of returns on the profitability of the manufacturer-collector pair by developing system-wide cost optimization models. Analyzing the properties of the optimal shipment frequency, we observe that the fastest reverse supply chain may not always be the most efficient one.

Ancillary