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Firm rib mass aspirate from a dog

Authors

  • Casey J. LeBlanc,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. Dr LeBlanc now is at the University of Tennessee.
      Corresponding author: Dr Casey J. LeBlanc, Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, 2407 River Dr, Knoxville, TN 37996–4542 (cleblanc@utk.edu).
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  • Christopher S. Roberts,

    1. Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. Dr LeBlanc now is at the University of Tennessee.
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  • Rudy W. Bauer,

    1. Louisiana Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.
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  • Kirk A. Ryan

    1. The Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.
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Corresponding author: Dr Casey J. LeBlanc, Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, 2407 River Dr, Knoxville, TN 37996–4542 (cleblanc@utk.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: A 9-year-old intact male Miniature Schnauzer presented laterally recumbent, cachexic, and dehydrated with multiple firm bone masses and a bilaterally enlarged prostate. Fine-needle aspiration of a rib mass revealed numerous basophilic polygonal to fusiform cells predominantly found in small to large clusters. The cells exhibited cytologic criteria of malignancy and infrequently displayed large cytoplasmic vacuoles containing finely- to coarsely-stippled azurophilic material. The cytologic diagnosis was metastatic adenocarci-noma and was suspected to be prostatic or transitional cell in origin because of the azurophilic vacuoles within malignant cells. Gross and histologic findings confirmed the clinical and cytologic diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma with widespread metastasis. Cytochemical and immunohistochemical investigation confirmed glycogen was a component of the vacuolar material. The vacuoles observed in the tumor in this case are not a consistent finding in tumors of the prostate or urinary bladder; however, when associated with an epithelial tumor, they may aid in limiting the differentials of the primary tumor and in the selection of further diagnostics.

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