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Sensitivity of Tru-cut and fine-needle aspiration biopsies of liver and kidney for diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis

Authors

  • Alessia Giordano,

    1. Dipartimento di Patologia Animale Igiene e Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria, Milano (Giordano, Paltrinieri, Parodi); Pronto Soccorso Veterinario, Lodi (Bertazzolo); and Centro Veterinario Croce Blu, Grumello del Monte, Bergamo (Milesi), Italy. Preliminary results were presented at the 19th annual meeting of the European Society for Veterinary Pathology, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25–28, 2001. Corresponding author: Alessia Giordano, DVM, PhD (alessia.giordano@unimi.it)
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  • Saverio Paltrinieri,

    1. Dipartimento di Patologia Animale Igiene e Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria, Milano (Giordano, Paltrinieri, Parodi); Pronto Soccorso Veterinario, Lodi (Bertazzolo); and Centro Veterinario Croce Blu, Grumello del Monte, Bergamo (Milesi), Italy. Preliminary results were presented at the 19th annual meeting of the European Society for Veterinary Pathology, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25–28, 2001. Corresponding author: Alessia Giordano, DVM, PhD (alessia.giordano@unimi.it)
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  • Walter Bertazzolo,

    1. Dipartimento di Patologia Animale Igiene e Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria, Milano (Giordano, Paltrinieri, Parodi); Pronto Soccorso Veterinario, Lodi (Bertazzolo); and Centro Veterinario Croce Blu, Grumello del Monte, Bergamo (Milesi), Italy. Preliminary results were presented at the 19th annual meeting of the European Society for Veterinary Pathology, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25–28, 2001. Corresponding author: Alessia Giordano, DVM, PhD (alessia.giordano@unimi.it)
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  • Emanuela Milesi,

    1. Dipartimento di Patologia Animale Igiene e Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria, Milano (Giordano, Paltrinieri, Parodi); Pronto Soccorso Veterinario, Lodi (Bertazzolo); and Centro Veterinario Croce Blu, Grumello del Monte, Bergamo (Milesi), Italy. Preliminary results were presented at the 19th annual meeting of the European Society for Veterinary Pathology, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25–28, 2001. Corresponding author: Alessia Giordano, DVM, PhD (alessia.giordano@unimi.it)
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  • Margherita Parodi

    1. Dipartimento di Patologia Animale Igiene e Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria, Milano (Giordano, Paltrinieri, Parodi); Pronto Soccorso Veterinario, Lodi (Bertazzolo); and Centro Veterinario Croce Blu, Grumello del Monte, Bergamo (Milesi), Italy. Preliminary results were presented at the 19th annual meeting of the European Society for Veterinary Pathology, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25–28, 2001. Corresponding author: Alessia Giordano, DVM, PhD (alessia.giordano@unimi.it)
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Abstract

Background: The detection of typical lesions and feline coronavirus (FCoV) antigen in tissues is the only conclusive method for making a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A positive result using Tru-cut biopsy (TCB) and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) has high diagnostic specificity, but information about the capacity of these techniques to correctly identify cats with FIP lesions is not available. Objectives: The diagnostic sensitivity of TCB and FNAB for detecting liver and kidney histologic lesions caused by FIP was evaluated. Methods: TCB and FNAB specimens collected mainly at necropsy from 25 cats with FIP were analyzed. Diagnostic sensitivity was calculated on the basis of the number of false-negative and true-positive specimens, compared with the number of organs bearing histologic lesions of FIP. Results: Diagnostic sensitivity was higher for hepatic TCB (64%) and FNAB (82%) than for renal (39% and 42%, respectively) procedures. A high percentage of renal cytologic and TCB specimens were inadequate. Combined analysis of TCB and FNAB specimens collected from the same organ increased the diagnostic sensitivity for liver (86%) and kidney (48%). The sensitivity of immunohistochemical/cytochemical analysis was low (11–38% depending on the technique), probably due to variable distribution of feline coronavirus in the lesions. Conclusion: Biopsy of liver and kidney can correctly identify FIP lesions. However, false-negative results or inadequate samples occur with moderate frequency, especially for immunochemical analysis. Diagnostic sensitivity may be increased when both TCB and FNAB specimens from the same organ are examined.

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