Cytologic identification of immature endospores in a dog with rhinosporidiosis

Authors

  • William A. Meier,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology (Meier, Meinkoth, Cunningham) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Brunker, Bahr), College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Meier is now at Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI. Corresponding author: William A. Meier, DVM, PhD (william.meier@covance.com)
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  • James H. Meinkoth,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology (Meier, Meinkoth, Cunningham) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Brunker, Bahr), College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Meier is now at Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI. Corresponding author: William A. Meier, DVM, PhD (william.meier@covance.com)
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  • Jill Brunker,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology (Meier, Meinkoth, Cunningham) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Brunker, Bahr), College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Meier is now at Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI. Corresponding author: William A. Meier, DVM, PhD (william.meier@covance.com)
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  • Debbie Cunningham,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology (Meier, Meinkoth, Cunningham) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Brunker, Bahr), College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Meier is now at Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI. Corresponding author: William A. Meier, DVM, PhD (william.meier@covance.com)
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  • Robert J. Bahr

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Pathobiology (Meier, Meinkoth, Cunningham) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Brunker, Bahr), College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Meier is now at Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI. Corresponding author: William A. Meier, DVM, PhD (william.meier@covance.com)
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Abstract

AbstractAbstract: An 8-year-old, intact, male Labrador Retriever was presented to the Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Oklahoma State University with a 2-month history of severe sneezing episodes that resulted in epistaxis and bilateral sanguineous discharge. Rhinoscopy revealed a small polypoid mass, and specimens were obtained for histopathology. Microscopic examination of formalin-fixed tissue specimens revealed organisms consistent with Rhinosporidium seeberi. The mass was surgically excised and impression smears were made for cytology examination. Smears revealed high numbers of endospores, typical of those previously described for R seeberi. In addition, numerous smaller structures, presumed to be immature endospores, were noted. The immature endospores were morphologically distinct from mature endospores and have not been described previously. Recognition of immature forms of Rhinosporidium may help prevent misidentification of the organism or misdiagnosis of a dual infection.

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