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CD34+, CD41+ acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in a dog

Authors

  • Steven E. Suter,,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Suter, London), and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology (Vernau, Fry), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA. Steven E. Suter is now at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. Michael M. Fry is now at the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. Cheryl A. London is now at the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Corresponding author: Steven E. Suter (steven_suter@ncsu.edu)
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  • William Vernau,,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Suter, London), and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology (Vernau, Fry), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA. Steven E. Suter is now at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. Michael M. Fry is now at the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. Cheryl A. London is now at the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Corresponding author: Steven E. Suter (steven_suter@ncsu.edu)
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  • Michael M. Fry,,

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Suter, London), and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology (Vernau, Fry), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA. Steven E. Suter is now at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. Michael M. Fry is now at the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. Cheryl A. London is now at the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Corresponding author: Steven E. Suter (steven_suter@ncsu.edu)
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  • Cheryl A. London

    1. From the Departments of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Suter, London), and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology (Vernau, Fry), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California–Davis, Davis, CA. Steven E. Suter is now at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. Michael M. Fry is now at the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. Cheryl A. London is now at the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Corresponding author: Steven E. Suter (steven_suter@ncsu.edu)
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Abstract

Abstract A clinically normal, 5-year-old intact female German Shepherd dog was presented to the local veterinarian to be spayed. Results of a preoperative CBC included mild nonregenerative anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, and 17% unclassified cells. On cytologic examination of aspirates from the dog's enlarged spleen and peripheral lymph nodes, a population of primitive round cells that occasionally resembled megakaryocytes was observed. A bone marrow aspirate specimen was markedly hypercellular with approximately 65% of marrow cells comprising a homogeneous population of immature hematopoietic cells similar to those found in the spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Using immunocytochemical stains with canine-specific antibodies, all neoplastic cells strongly expressed cytoplasmic CD41 and 20–70% of the neoplastic cells expressed CD34 weakly to moderately. Rare (<0.5%) neoplastic cells weakly expressed vWF. The cells were negative for all other markers. Based on these results and the morphology of the neoplastic cells, a diagnosis of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMegL) was made. In spite of treatment, results of a CBC performed 1 week later indicated progressive anemia and thrombocytopenia, and the dog was euthanized. To our knowledge, this report documents the first case of canine AMegL diagnosed with both anti-canine CD34 and CD41 antibodies.

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