• Open Access

Thrombocytopenia in Cats: A Retrospective Study of 41 Cases

Authors

  • Holly L. Jordan DVM,

    1. Departments of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
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  • Carol B. Grindem DVM, PhD,

    1. Departments of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
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    • 3

      North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

  • Edward B. Breitschwerdt DVM

    1. Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC
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Abstract

The prevalence of feline thrombocytopenia (<200,000 platelets/&#x006d;̈L) at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, from January 1985 to March 1990, was 1.2% (41/3300). Cats were divided into six categories based on clinical diagnoses: 29% (12/41) had infectious disease, 20% (8/41) had neoplasia, 7% (3/41) had cardiac disease, 2% (1/41) had primary immune-mediated disease, 22% (9/41) had multiple diseases, and 20% (8/41) had disorders of unknown etiology. The mean platelet count for all thrombocytopenic cats was 52,000/μL ± 46,000/μL (1 SD) with a range of 1000–190,000/μL. No significant differences were found between groups with respect to platelet count, packed cell volume, or white blood cell count, though anemia and leukopenia were common among the cats as a whole. Bleeding disorders (hemorrhage or thrombosis) were observed in 29% (12/41) of thrombocytopenic cats and were more likely to be associated with neoplasia, cardiac disease, and platelet counts less than or equal to 30,000/μL. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy was diagnosed in 12% (5/41) of the cats. Infections and/or neoplasia affecting the bone marrow were the most common diseases associated with thrombocytopenia. Feline leukemia virus and myeloproliferative neoplasia accounted for approximately 44% (18/41) of the specific diagnoses in thrombocytopenic cats. (Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 1993; 7:261–265. Copyright © 1993 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.)

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