• Open Access

Splenic Infarction in 16 Dogs: A Retrospective Study

Authors

  • Elizabeth M. Hardie,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Companion Animals and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shelly L. Vaden,

    1. Department of Companion Animals and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kathy Spaulding,

    1. Department of Anesthesiology, Physiological Sciences, and Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David E. Malarkey

    1. Department of Microbiology, Pathology and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
    Search for more papers by this author

College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Abstract

Sixteen dogs with splenic infarction due to causes other than splenic torsion were identified. Dogs with splenic infarction often had multiple concurrent diseases, and surgical management of splenic infarction was associated with high mortality. Splenic infarction occurred in dogs with hypercoagulable conditions associated with liver disease, renal disease, and hyperadrenocorticism, or as a consequence of uniform splenomegaly, neoplasia, or thrombosis associated with cardiovascular disease. Clinical signs and common laboratory findings generally reflected the underlying disease process. A variety of splenic abnormalities were detected by abdominal ultrasound in 15 dogs, with the ventral extremity of the spleen being most often abnormal. Four dogs were euthanized or died because of the presence of severe systemic disease, whereas 12 dogs underwent laparotomy. Complete splenectomy was performed in 9 dogs and partial splenectomy was performed in 2 dogs. Seven dogs died in the immediate postoperative period, 3 required chronic veterinary care, and 2 had uncomplicated long-term recoveries. Splenic infarction should be regarded as a sign of altered blood flow and coagulation, rather than as a primary disease, and surgical management should be reserved for patients with life-threatening complications such as hemoabdomen or sepsis.

Ancillary