• Open Access

Platelet Hyperfunction in Dogs With Malignancies

Authors

  • Elizabeth A. McNiel,

    1. Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
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  • Gregory K. Ogilvie DVM,

    1. Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
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    • 2

      Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

  • Martin J. Fettman,

    1. Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
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  • Mowafak D. Salman

    1. Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
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Abstract

In vitro platelet aggregometry was performed on whole blood samples from 59 dogs with malignancies and 24 control dogs. Three reagents were used for the aggregation studies: collagen, arachidonic acid, and adenosine diphos-phate (ADP). The parameters measured to evaluate response to collagen included delay in the aggregation response, slope of the aggregation curve, maximum aggregation, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion. The platelets of dogs with malignancies exhibited significantly (P < .05) shorter delays in the aggregation response, higher maximum aggregation, and higher ATP secretion when compared to control dogs. For the weaker reagents, ADP and arachidonic acid, the lowest concentration resulting in aggregation was determined. Platelets of dogs with malignancies tended to aggregate in response to lower concentrations of ADP than did those of controls (P < .05). The response of platelets to the concentrations of arachidonic acid employed in this study was poor, with few samples achieving measurable aggregation. The findings of this study suggest that dogs with malignancies have hyperaggregable platelets.

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