• Open Access

Canine Anal Sac Adenocarcinomas: Clinical Presentation and Response to Therapy

Authors

  • Peter F. Bennett,

    Corresponding author
    1. Purdue Comparative Oncology Program, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
      Diplomate ACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre, 70 Blackburn Road, Glen Waverley, Victoria 3150, Australia; e-mail: pfbvet@yahoo.com.
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    • 3

      Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre, Glen Waverley, Victoria, Australia.

  • Denis B. DeNicola,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
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  • Patty Bonney,

    1. Purdue Comparative Oncology Program, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
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  • Nita W. Glickman,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
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  • Deborah W. Knapp

    1. Purdue Comparative Oncology Program, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
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Diplomate ACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre, 70 Blackburn Road, Glen Waverley, Victoria 3150, Australia; e-mail: pfbvet@yahoo.com.

Abstract

A retrospective study of 43 dogs with anal sac adenocarcinoma (ASAC) was performed to characterize the clinical presentation and response to treatment. Clinical signs at presentation varied considerably, with signs related either to sublumbar nodal metastasis (tenesmus or constipation) or hypercalcemia (polyuria-polydipsia and anorexia) being the most frequent findings. At the time of presentation, 23 (53%) dogs had hypercalcemia and 34 (79%) had metastases, with the regional lymph nodes (31 dogs, 72%) being the most common site of metastasis. A variety of chemotherapeutic agents were administered, with partial remission (PR) recorded in 4 of 13 (31%) dogs treated with cisplatin and in 1 of 3 (33%) dogs treated with carboplatin. The median survival for all dogs was 6 months (range, 2 days-41 months). There was no statistical association between the presence of hypercalcemia and survival, although the power of the study to detect an increase in survival of 3 months was low (.33). We conclude that platinum chemotherapy has antitumor activity in canine apocrine gland carcinoma and that further study of these agents is warranted.

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