• Open Access

Association of Systemic Hypertension with Renal Injury in Dogs with Induced Renal Failure

Authors

  • Delmar R. Finco

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA. Presented as an abstract, J Vet Int Med 2003;17:406.
    Search for more papers by this author

Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602;e-mail: dfin-co@vet.uga.edu.

Abstract

Systemic hypertension is hypothesized to cause renal injury to dogs. This study was performed on dogs with surgically induced renal failure to determine whether hypertension was associated with altered renal function or morphology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) were measured before and after surgery. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine protein: creatinine ratios (UPC) were measured at 1, 12, 24, 36, and 56–69 weeks after surgery, and renal histology was evaluated terminally. The mean of weekly MAP, SAP, and DAP measurements for each dog over the 1st 26 weeks was used to rank dogs on the basis of MAP, SAP, or DAP values. A statistically significant association was found between systemic arterial pressure ranking and ranked measures of adverse renal responses. When dogs were divided into higher pressure and lower pressure groups on the basis of SAP, group 1 (higher pressure, n = 9) compared with group 2 (lower pressure, n = 10) had significantly lower GFR values at 36 and 56–69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56–69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, and fibrosis. When dogs were divided on MAP and DAP values, group 1 compared with group 2 had significantly lower GFR values at 12, 24, 36, and 56–69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56–69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, fibrosis, and cell infiltrate. These results demonstrate an association between increased systemic arterial pressure and renal injury. Results from this study might apply to dogs with some types of naturally occurring renal failure.

Ancillary