An evolutionary concept analysis of school violence: From bullying to death

Authors

  • Sandra N. Jones DrNPc, PMHCNS-BC,

    1. Doctoral Nursing Candidate, Certified Gang Specialist, Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Roberta Waite Ed D, APRN, CNS-BC, FAAN,

    1. Associate Professor, Assistant Dean of Faculty Integration and Evaluation of Community Programs, Interdisciplinary Research Unit, Doctoral Nursing Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Paul Thomas Clements PhD, APRN-BC, CGS, DF-IAFN

    1. Associate Clinical Professor, Certified Gang Specialist, Distinguished Fellow - International Association of Forensic Nurses, Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Sandra N. Jones, DrNPc, PMHCNS-BC, 4705 Belle Forte Road, Pikesville, MD 21208. Tel: (443) 802 9932; E-mail: sjones9090@aol.com

Abstract

School violence has evolved into an identifiably pervasive public health problem. Adverse consequences of school violence vary from bullying to death. In 2007, 457,700 youth (ages 12–18) were victims of serious crimes with 34% occurring on school grounds or on the way to school. A concept analysis of school violence can expand and enhance awareness of the pervasive phenomenon of school violence. Rodgers and Knafl (1993) evolutionary concept analysis method was used to provide a guiding framework for examination of school violence. Related manuscripts from the extant interdisciplinary school violence literature were obtained from relevant health science databases, the Education Resources Information Center, and various governmental and specialty websites within the contemporary time frame of 2000–2010. Analysis revealed the enormous scope and complexity of the problem of school violence including bullying, physical fighting, weapon carrying, alcohol/substance use and street gang presence on school property, school-associated violent death, safe schools legislation, and violence prevention strategies. Forensic nurses across practice settings are uniquely positioned to intervene to improve health of these youth through identification, assessment, treatment, and referral.

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