Do Suicides’ Characteristics Influence Survivors’ Emotions?

Authors

  • Barbara Schneider MD, MSc,

    1. Barbara Schneider, Kristin Grebner, and Klaus Georgi, Department of Psychiatry, Center of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main Germany; Axel Schnabel, Centre of Legal Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kristin Grebner MSc,

    1. Barbara Schneider, Kristin Grebner, and Klaus Georgi, Department of Psychiatry, Center of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main Germany; Axel Schnabel, Centre of Legal Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Axel Schnabel MD,

    1. Barbara Schneider, Kristin Grebner, and Klaus Georgi, Department of Psychiatry, Center of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main Germany; Axel Schnabel, Centre of Legal Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Klaus Georgi PhD

    1. Barbara Schneider, Kristin Grebner, and Klaus Georgi, Department of Psychiatry, Center of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main Germany; Axel Schnabel, Centre of Legal Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Barbara Schneider, Department of Psychiatry, Center of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Heinrich-Hoffmann-Str. 10, D-60528 Frankfurt/Main, Germany; E-mail: B.Schneider@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Abstract

The suicide of a related person can often induce severe negative emotional reactions. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between sociodemographic and diagnostic data of suicides and survivors’ emotions and to close this substantial gap. The main outcome of this study was that survivors’ severity of emotional disturbance was inversely correlated with age of suicides. In the multivariable approach, only age remained related to the majority of the assessed survivors’ emotions, whereas other characteristics, such as gender, presence of psychiatric disorder, or suicide method were not associated with survivors’ emotions. Age had a dominant impact on the relationship between suicides’ characteristics and survivors’ emotional reactions and supersedes the effect of most suicides’ characteristics including diagnoses.

Ancillary