The Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk: State of Workshop Education

Authors

  • Anthony R. Pisani PhD,

    1. Anthony R. Pisani, Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Wendi F. Cross, Psychiatry (Psychology) and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Madelyn S. Gould, Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute.
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  • Wendi F. Cross PhD,

    1. Anthony R. Pisani, Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Wendi F. Cross, Psychiatry (Psychology) and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Madelyn S. Gould, Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute.
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  • Madelyn S. Gould PhD, MPH

    1. Anthony R. Pisani, Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Wendi F. Cross, Psychiatry (Psychology) and Pediatrics, University of Rochester; Madelyn S. Gould, Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute.
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Address correspondence to Anthony R. Pisani, Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; E-mail: anthony_pisani@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

A systematic search of popular and scholarly databases identified workshops that addressed general clinical competence in the assessment or management of suicide risk, targeted mental health professionals, and had at least one peer-reviewed publication. We surveyed workshop developers and examined empirical articles associated with each workshop. The state of workshop education is characterized by presenting the learning objectives, educational formats, instructor factors, and evaluation studies. Workshops are efficacious for transferring knowledge and shifting attitudes; however, their role in improving clinical care and outcomes of suicidal patients has yet to be determined.

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