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Risk for Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts Associated with Co-occurring Depression and Conduct Problems in Early Adolescence

Authors

  • Ann Vander Stoep PhD,

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • Molly Adrian PhD,

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • Elizabeth Mc Cauley PhD,

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • Sheila E. Crowell PhD,

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • Andrea Stone PhD,

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • Cynthia Flynn PhD

    1. AnnVanderStoep, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; MollyAdrian, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; ElizabethMc Cauley, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Sheila E. Crowell, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; AndreaStone, Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington Bothell, Bothell, WA, USA; CynthiaFlynn, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
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  • This study was funded by a Young Investigator Award from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, by R01-MH63711 and F31 MH 74196 from the National Institutes of Mental Health and Drug Abuse, and T32 HD052462 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The authors wish to thank the Seattle children and parents who participated in the Developmental Pathways Project.

Address correspondence to Ann Vander Stoep, PhD, University of Washington, Child Health Institute, 6200 NE 74th Street, Suite 215, Seattle, WA 98115-8160; E-mail: annv@u.washington.edu

Abstract

This study investigates the early manifestation of co-occurring depression and conduct problems as a predictor of heightened risk for later suicidal ideation and behavior in a community sample of 521 adolescents. Self-reported symptoms of depression and conduct problems were evaluated in early 6th grade. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors were tracked through multiple assessments carried out over the middle school years. Compared to adolescents with depression symptoms only, conduct problem symptoms only, or low psychopathology, those with co-occurring depression and conduct problem symptoms had the highest risk for subsequent suicidal ideation, recurrent suicidal behaviors, and suicide attempts.

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