Risk of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents with both Self-Asphyxial Risk-Taking Behavior and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

Authors

  • Amy M. Brausch PhD,

    1. Amy M.Brausch, Kristina M.Decker, and Andrea G.Hadley, Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA.
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  • Kristina M. Decker BS,

    1. Amy M.Brausch, Kristina M.Decker, and Andrea G.Hadley, Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA.
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  • Andrea G. Hadley BS

    1. Amy M.Brausch, Kristina M.Decker, and Andrea G.Hadley, Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA.
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  • The authors would like to thank and acknowledge Gaye Harrison and I Sing the Body Electric (888-550-7464; http://www.isbe.org) coalition for their support of these analyses by granting access to their existing data.

Address correspondence to Amy M. Brausch, Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL; E-mail: abrausch@eiu.edu

Abstract

This study examined adolescent participation in self-asphyxial risk-taking behaviors (SAB), sometimes known as the “choking game,” and its relationship with other adolescent risk behaviors, including non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Researchers proposed that participation in SAB and NSSI would be associated with suicidal behavior, disordered eating, and substance use. Using a large community-based sample, results revealed preliminary associations between SAB and other risk-taking behaviors. Adolescents who had engaged in both SAB and NSSI reported more concurrent risk behaviors than adolescents who participated in only one of the behaviors or neither behavior. Results indicate that greater awareness of SAB is important, and continued research can evaluate the possible link between the behavior and risk for suicide.

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