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Changes in attitudes, confidence, and practice behaviors were assessed among 452 clinicians who completed the training, Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk, and who work with clients at risk for suicide. Data were collected at three time points. Scores on measures of attitudes toward suicide prevention and confidence to work with clients at risk for suicide improved over time. Clinical practice behaviors improved for assessing and formulating suicide risk, developing suicide prevention treatment plans, and responding to vignettes. Results suggest training can improve clinicians’ attitudes toward suicide, confidence to work with clients at risk for suicide, and, most importantly, clinical practice skills.