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The Moderating Effect of the Negative Impact of Recent Life Events on the Relation between Intrinsic Religiosity and Death Ideation in Older Adults

Authors

  • Danielle R. Jahn MA,

    1. Danielle R. Jahn, Erin K. Poindexter, Ryan D. Graham, and Kelly C. Cukrowicz, Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA.
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  • Erin K. Poindexter BA,

    1. Danielle R. Jahn, Erin K. Poindexter, Ryan D. Graham, and Kelly C. Cukrowicz, Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA.
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  • Ryan D. Graham MA,

    1. Danielle R. Jahn, Erin K. Poindexter, Ryan D. Graham, and Kelly C. Cukrowicz, Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA.
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  • Kelly C. Cukrowicz PhD

    1. Danielle R. Jahn, Erin K. Poindexter, Ryan D. Graham, and Kelly C. Cukrowicz, Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA.
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  • Address correspondence to K. C. Cukrowicz, Department of Psychology, Mail Stop 42051, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2051; E-mail: kelly.cukrowicz@ttu.edu

This study was partially funded by an American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Young Investigator Grant (Principal Investigator: Kelly C. Cukrowicz; Title: Interpersonal Vulnerability in Older Caucasian Males: An Examination of the Role of Perceived Burdensomeness). Special thanks to Erin F. Schlegel, Evan T. Guidry, Amy Bryant, Justin M. Stevens, and Sean M. Mitchell for their assistance in data collection and entry.

Abstract

Researchers tested the hypothesis that the negative impact of recent life events would moderate the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and death ideation in older adults. Participants (n = 272) completed assessments of death ideation, intrinsic religiosity, and negative impact of recent life events. We confirmed the presence of concurrent moderation and found that older adults with greater negative impact of recent life events and high intrinsic religiosity reported greater death ideation. These relatively surprising findings may be due to reduced fear of death in intrinsically religious older adults, an explanation consistent with previous research.

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