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Mood, Anxiety, and Substance-Use Disorders and Suicide Risk in a Military Population Cohort

Authors

  • Kenneth R. Conner PsyD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. VISN2 Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention, Canandaigua VA Medical Center, Canandaigua, NY, USA
    • Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Michael D. McCarthy PhD,

    1. United States Air Force, AF Pentagon, Washington, DC, USA
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  • Alina Bajorska MA,

    1. Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Eric D. Caine MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. VISN2 Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention, Canandaigua VA Medical Center, Canandaigua, NY, USA
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  • Xin M. Tu PhD,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Kerry L. Knox PhD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. VISN2 Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention, Canandaigua VA Medical Center, Canandaigua, NY, USA
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  • The study was supported by U.S. National Institutes of Mental Health, K. L. Knox, PI (R01 MH075017-01A1). The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

Address correspondence to Kenneth R. Conner, University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, 300 Crittenden Blvd, Rochester, NY 14642; E-mail: kenneth_conner@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

There are meager prospective data from nonclinical samples on the link between anxiety disorders and suicide or the extent to which the association varies over time. We examined these issues in a cohort of 309,861 U.S. Air Force service members, with 227 suicides over follow-up. Mental disorder diagnoses including anxiety, mood, and substance-use disorders (SUD) were based on treatment encounters. Risk for suicide associated with anxiety disorders were lower compared with mood disorders and similar to SUD. Moreover, the associations between mood and anxiety disorders with suicide were greatest within a year of treatment presentation.

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