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A Multi-Channel Approach to Language Teaching

Authors

  • Gisela Huberman,

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    • 1

      Gisela Huberman (Ph.D., George Washington University) is Assistant Professor, Department of Language and Foreign Studies, American University, Washington, D.C.

  • Vadim Medish

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      Vadim Medish (Ph.D., American University) is Chairman, Department of Language and Foreign Studies, American University, Washington, D.C.


Abstract

ABSTRACT  The most important aspect of multi-channel instruction is the fact that it telescopes two years of college language–elementary and intermediate levels—into one year without increasing the number of contact hours. Knowing that he can do it twice as fast, the student is more willing to learn a second language. This approach to language teaching makes the learning process an exciting, intellectually challenging, and gratifying experience, thus eliminating another psychological obstacle to language learning—boredom. For its effectiveness, instruction depends on the latest findings of psycholinguistics and on systematic use of television. Television is used in each lesson to add a visual dimension to audiolingual methodology, to simulate the cultural environment, and to provide a powerful motivation reinforcement. As a result, the usual gap between active and passive language skills is overcome and the learning process is expedited.

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