Two New Strategies for Computer-Assiste Language Instruction (CAL)

Authors

  • G.E. Nelson,

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      G.E. Nelson (Ph.D., Yale University)

  • Jean Renard Ward,

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      Jean Renard Ward (S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Assistant Professor of Foreign Literatures, Student in Electrical Engineering, Research Staff Member, and Professor of Materials Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

  • Samuel H. Desch,

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      Samuel H. Desch (B.E.E., Cornell University), Assistant Professor of Foreign Literatures, Student in Electrical Engineering, Research Staff Member, and Professor of Materials Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

  • Roy Kaplow

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      Roy Kaplow (Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology) are, respectively, Assistant Professor of Foreign Literatures, Student in Electrical Engineering, Research Staff Member, and Professor of Materials Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts


Abstract

ABSTRACT CAI has yet to fulfill the promise it seemed to hold for language instruction. Its failure to do so is to a large extent the result of the failure of existing CALI programs to take full advantage of the interactive capabilities of the computer. At M.I.T. two new strategies have been developed in CALI to take advantage of these capabilities. In one of them, used to teach German reading, the student learns to translate German into English by asking the computer program questions about the structure and vocabulary of exercise sentences until he is able to translate them. In the other, used to teach German word order, the computer is programmed with rules for German word on which allow it to recognize all the correct oreings of exercise sentences and give the studyrules which allow him to correct erroneous derings. These strategies may be combined other techniques, and with each other, to exercises which function in much the same maner as a drill run by a teacher. Since the puter is still not able to deal with the language, such exercises are best used in junction with classroom work in the first or in a self-paced grammar review in the sew year.

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