Shock metamorphism of quartz in nature and experiment: I. Basic observation and theory

Authors

  • Dieter Stöffler,

    1. Institut für Planetologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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    • Museum für Naturkunde, Institut für Mineralogie und Petrographie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Invalidenstraße 43, D-10115 Berlin, Germany

  • Falko Langenhorst

    1. Institut für Planetologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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    • Laboratoire de Structure et Proprietés de L'Etat Solide, Bât. C.6, Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France


  • Publication of this article was finded by the Barringer Crater Company.

Abstract

Abstract— Quartz, as a ubiquitous mineral constituent of the Earth's crust, displays the greatest variety of well-defined residual shock effects among all rock-forming minerals. It represents an important and most reliable shock barometer and thermometer for terrestrial impact formations. In this paper, the current status of knowledge about the nature, origin, and experimental pressure-temperature calibration of shock-induced deformations and phase transformations is reviewed for natural and experimental shock conditions.

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