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Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers' perceptions about the influence of scholarship on their decision to teach and to teach in a high-needs school were examined using cluster analysis. Three hundred and four STEM scholars, who were currently teaching, and who received funding from 45 institutions located throughout the United States responded to this national survey that was part of a larger cross-sectional program evaluation. Three disparate clusters were identified: less committed to becoming a teacher and teaching in a high-needs school, highly committed to becoming a teacher but not to teaching in a high-needs school, and highly committed to becoming a teacher and teaching in a high-needs school. Furthermore, the results indicated that the recipient's race and the time when the scholar learned about the scholarship were related to cluster membership. These results can be used to target STEM majors who may be influenced by scholarships to enter teaching and to teach in high-needs schools.