Effects of ketoprofen and phenylbutazone on chronic hoof pain and lameness in the horse

Authors

  • JANE G. OWENS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.
      Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, PO Box 12137, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27513, USA.
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  • S. G. KAMERLING,

    1. Department of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.
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  • S. R. STANTON,

    1. Department of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.
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  • M. L. KEOWEN

    1. Department of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.
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Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, PO Box 12137, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27513, USA.

Summary

The analgesic effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ketoprofen (2.2 and 3.63 mg/kg bwt) and phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg bwt) were compared in 7 horses with chronic laminitis. Hoof pain was quantified objectively by means of an electronic hoof tester and lameness was subjectively graded on a modified Obel scale. Ketoprofen at a dose of 3.63 mg/kg bwt (phenylbutazone equimolar dose) reduced hoof pain and lameness to a greater extent than the 2.2 mg/kg dose and phenylbutazone. These effects were still present at 24 h in 3 of the 4 pain tests, including lameness grade. These data suggest that ketoprofen at the dosage rate of 1.65 times the recommended therapeutic dose was more potent than phenylbutazone in alleviating chronic pain and lameness in horses.

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